The tools your dreams need...

The Eighty-Year Rule

Have you ever wanted more out of life?

Have you ever thought about following your dreams?

The Eighty-Year Rule gives you the tools you need to live boldly and to dare greatly.

With exercises included, this book helps you to assess where you are in life and offers steps and activities to help you get where you want to be.

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Testimonials

“Imagine being an attorney and earning a six-figure income only to realize that you don’t like your job and want to quit.

Such is the true story of Claire Yeung in her book, The Eighty Year Rule: What would you regret not doing in your lifetime?

Not only does Claire tell the story of her parents’ migration from Hong Kong to Canada but explains how she started her Whole Person Certified Coach business. The story is, in and of itself, striking.

However, Claire ‘throws in some extras’ by providing worksheets that help you brainstorm your core values and lists of wise sayings such as “Always keep your brain active and continue learning.”

The Eighty Year Rule is an excellent book for anyone contemplating a career change or any other life decision as it is morale-boosting and effective.

My favorite quote: “It’s never too late to live authentically with purpose and meaning.”

Aurelia McNeil

“This clear, concise and inspirational ‘how to’ guide will help anyone “press the restart button” on their own life and pay attention to what really matters: “living boldly and daring greatly.”

A useful read for those who want to act on their own dreams.”

Norman Nawrocki

About the author

I’m passionate about living life to the fullest. I love adventure, travel, great food, good wine, running, cycling, kayaking, and British detective shows.

During my 20+ years as an attorney I encountered many unhappy people whose lives were stuck in a rut. That’s what lead me to my true calling – becoming a Whole Person Certified Coach to help others to do and be their best, to achieve their goals and dreams, and to live boldly and without regret